when it feels like God is gone

closed eyed man holding his face using both of his hands

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Psalm 22:1-5

Psalm 22:11 My God, my God, why have you abandoned me? Why are you so far from my rescue and from my words of groaning?

Psalm 22:2 My God, I cry by day, but you do not answer, by night, and there is no quiet for me.

Psalm 22:3 But you are holy, enthroned on the praise songs of Israel.

Psalm 22:4 Our fathers trusted in you; they trusted, and you rescued them.

Psalm 22:5 They cried to you and were set free; they trusted in you and were not disgraced.

when it feels like God is gone

David’s words capture the feeling of abandonment so well that our Lord himself used them to express his emotions while in agony on the cross. David’s years of loyalty and trust have come down to this one event when he needs God the most, but it felt like God was gone. He kept storming the gates of heaven with noisy prayers, because his calls were not answered.

Notice the theology and history of these words. David confesses the holiness of God and recounts many times his ancestors were rescued by God. He knows God is still there and is just as powerful as ever. He is just overwhelmed by the contradiction between his theology and his personal experience in the present.

When we get to this place, we can follow David’s pattern of prayer. He begins by remembering who God is, and what he has done. Just remembering our theology and history itself can help us overcome the deceptive feeling that God his gone. Our God is not going anywhere.

Lord, you were there for us in the past, and you are still here now. Thank you for your presence, even when we don’t feel it.

1superscription: A Psalm of David.

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About Jefferson Vann

Jefferson Vann is a former Christian missionary who now lives in Williamsburg, Virginia. If your church or small group would like to hear Jeff speak, you can contact him at marmsky@gmail.com -- !
This entry was posted in deliverance, dependence upon God, dissapointment, theology, trust and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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