prevailing injustice

july-13

devotional post # 2076

Luke 23:13-25

Luk 23:13 Pilate then collected together the chief priests and the rulers and the people,
Luk 23:14 and said to them, “You brought me this man as if he were misleading the people. But after examining him before you, notice, I did not find this man guilty of any of your charges against him.
Luk 23:15 Neither did Herod, because he sent him back to us. Notice, nothing deserving death has been done by him.
Luk 23:16 I will therefore punish and release him.”
Luk 23:17
Luk 23:18 But they all yelled out together, “Away with this man, and release to us Barabbas”–
Luk 23:19 a man who had been thrown into prison for a rebellion started in the city and for murder.
Luk 23:20 Pilate spoke out to them once more, wanting to release Jesus,
Luk 23:21 but they kept yelling, “Crucify, crucify him!”
Luk 23:22 A third time he asked them, “Why, what evil has he done? I have found in him no guilt deserving death. I will therefore punish and release him.”
Luk 23:23 But they were insistent, demanding with loud yells that he should be crucified. And their voices prevailed.
Luk 23:24 So Pilate decided that their demand should be granted.
Luk 23:25 He released the man who had been thrown into prison for rebellion and murder, for whom they asked, but he delivered Jesus over to their purpose.

prevailing injustice

Neither Pilate nor Herod had found Jesus guilty of anything deserving death, but the loud yells of the chief priests and rulers prevailed over the concept of justice. It is often that way among us. What we know to be right is sacrificed to the highest bidder. Justice did not demand that the Lord be murdered that way. But injustice prevailed because its was the loudest voice.

The next time you catch yourself getting louder to make your case, stop and consider.

LORD, give us the wisdom to listen to voices other than the loudest, so that justice might prevail.

Advertisements

About Jefferson Vann

Jeff is a Christian missionary.
This entry was posted in conscience, discernment, justice and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s