ministering in wrath and grief

September 2015 (1)Mark 3:1-6

1 Then he entered again into the synagogue; and a man was there who has a dried up hand. 2 So they were watching him to see if on one of the Sabbaths he would heal him, in order that they might bring charges against him. 3 And he says to the man having the dry hand, “Get up into the middle!” 4 And he says to them, “Is it proper to do good or to do harm on the Sabbath, to rescue[1] a life or to kill?” But they were silent. 5 After looking around at them in wrath, deeply grieved at their stubbornness of heart, he says to the man, “Extend your hand.” And he extended it, and his hand was restored. 6 The Pharisees went out and just then began plotting with the Herodians against Him, as to how they might destroy Him.

ministering in wrath and grief

If Jesus had wanted to keep the peace he could have avoided this confrontation. All he had to do was heal the man privately. But Jesus stomped in there and publically performed his ministry, knowing that people were watching him. He not only committed the offense, but did it with a wrathful tone, demonstrating that he was deeply upset with his enemies. He obviously was not as concerned about keeping up a public persona of unity. What he did made his antagonists even more committed to his murder, joining forces with a rival group to plot it.

There will be times when peace and unity will not be the outcome of your ministry. Ministry is spiritual warfare, and battles seldom end with a complete win. If even Jesus could not do ministry without such outcomes, we should expect them as well. We should commit to serve with integrity, even if our enemies use our very service to condemn us.

LORD, we choose to serve you and others in your name, even if we have to do so opposed and criticised.


[1] σωζω (3:4; 5:23, 28, 34; 6:56; 8:35; 10:26, 52; 13:13, 20; 15:30f; 16:16).

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About Jefferson Vann

Jeff is a Christian missionary.
This entry was posted in commitment, criticism, ministry, spiritual warfare and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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